November 20, 2010

Gilgamesh


This fall, I took a Sequential class at SCAD called "Conceptual Illustration." Throughout the quarter, we were writing a story, designing and developing the main character, environments, props, side characters, etc. We were required to build a maquette of the character, a model of an environment/structure, and a prop, vehicle, or animal sidekick. Each part had to be supported by developmental sketches, turnaround views, orthographic projections, color keys, etc. It was a ton of work, but it was one of the most rewarding classes in my graduate school experience. (Ironically, it was an undergraduate level class.)

Earlier this year, I had stumbled upon Gilgamesh when researching the Biblical character, Nimrod. I was immediately intrigued, and began researching this Sumerian warrior-king, whom extra-biblical sources sometimes equated with Nimrod. I read some translations of the Gilgamesh Epic (probably the oldest surviving literary work), studied Sumerian archaeology and culture, and began trying to harmonize the biblical account with the surviving Babylonian account. Much of this was surprisingly easy. For instance, the Sumerian record of kings has Gilgamesh ruling Uruk for 120 years. Secular history does not allow for such long lifespans—biblical history does. The Epic also contains a strikingly similar telling of the great flood to the account in Genesis.

Anyway, I could bore you with all the loads of fascinating stuff I learned, or I could just show you the work I did. For the purposes of the class, our story had to be a "retelling" if we were basing it on an existing story line. So this isn't meant to be historical or factual, even though I attempted to give it that flavor.











4 comments:

  1. Beautiful, as always! Also, DINOSAURS! Woot.

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  2. Nice work. Have you read 'Legend: The Genesis of Civilisation' by David Rohl by the way?

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  3. Thanks. No, I haven't heard of it.

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  4. Hello, I volunteer for a community theater and was wondering if I could use your illustration of Peter and the Wolf for a community poster and newspaper ad? It is for a children's performance. I would definately put your name on the poster so you would have full credit. Please let me know I could use it.

    thanks, Karen
    kmedwetz@yahoo.com

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